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What Does Hydrocodone Look Like? Effects of Hydrocodone

What does a hydrocodone pill look like? What hydrocodone pills look like can change depending on the manufacturer and dosage. View images of hydrocodone and read more about treatment options for Hydrocodone addiction.


What Does Hydrocodone Look Like?

Hydrocodone is a prescription medication that is available in different forms and strengths, and the appearance of the pill may vary depending on the manufacturer and the strength of the medication. In the United States, hydrocodone is usually available in tablet, capsule, or liquid form.

What does a hydrocodone pill look like? Hydrocodone tablets are typically white or off-white, oval-shaped or oblong-shaped, and may have an imprint of the medication name or a code number on one side of the tablet. The strength of the medication is usually indicated on the other side of the tablet.

Capsules containing hydrocodone may be either solid or liquid-filled, and the color of the capsule may vary depending on the manufacturer.

Liquid hydrocodone may be clear or have a yellowish tint and is typically sold in small bottles with a dropper or a measuring cup.

It is important to note that the appearance of hydrocodone and the pills that look like hydrocodone can vary, and it is always best to verify the identity of any medication with a licensed healthcare provider or pharmacist. Do not take any medication that is not prescribed to you. Moreover, don’t take more than the prescribed dose.

How to Identify Counterfeit Hydrocodone?

What does a Hydrocodone look like? Counterfeit Hydrocodone can be very dangerous, as it may contain incorrect or unknown ingredients, which can lead to serious health problems or even death. To identify counterfeit Hydrocodone, you can follow these steps:

  • Check the packaging: Counterfeit Hydrocodone may have packaging that looks different from the genuine product. Look for inconsistencies in the printing quality, colors, or overall design of the packaging.
  • Check the pills: Counterfeit Hydrocodone pills may look different from the genuine product. Look for differences in size, shape, color, or markings on the pill.
  • Check the label: The label on the packaging should contain information about the manufacturer, dosage, and expiration date. Look for any spelling errors or other mistakes on the label.
  • Check the source: Only purchase Hydrocodone from a reputable source, such as a licensed pharmacy or a trusted online retailer. Avoid purchasing Hydrocodone from street vendors or unlicensed sources.
  • Check for strange side effects: If you experience any unusual side effects after taking Hydrocodone, such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness, or difficulty breathing, stop taking the medication and seek medical attention immediately.

It’s important to always follow your doctor’s instructions when taking prescription medication, and never take medication that has not been prescribed for you. If you suspect that you have received counterfeit Hydrocodone, report it to the appropriate authorities and your healthcare provider.

What Does a Hydrocodone Pill Look Like?

Hydrocodone pills come in various shapes, sizes, and colors depending on the manufacturer and dosage strength. Hydrocodone is typically combined with acetaminophen and marketed under the brand names Norco, Vicodin, Lortab, and others.

Some examples of what Hydrocodone pills may look like include:

  • Norco: Yellow, oblong tablet imprinted with “NORCO” on one side and a number on the other.
  • Vicodin: White, oval tablet imprinted with “VICODIN” on one side and a number on the other.
  • Lortab: White, capsule-shaped tablet imprinted with “LORTAB” on one side and a number on the other.

What pills look like hydrocodone? It’s important to note that the appearance of Hydrocodone pills may vary depending on the manufacturer and dosage strength, so it’s always best to check the label or consult with your pharmacist or healthcare provider to ensure that you have the correct medication.

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Hydrocodone Abuse Statistics

Hydrocodone is one of the most frequently prescribed opioids in the United States. More than 136.7 million prescriptions for hydrocodone-containing products were dispensed in 2013. More recently, misuse has significantly decreased from 6.9 million U.S. persons to 5.5 million in 2017 and 2018, respectively.


2.1 million

An estimated 2.1 million in the United States alone abuse opioid pain reliever medications.

Source: NIDA

136.7 million

Hydrocodone is the most frequently prescribed opioid in The United States, with more than 136.7 million prescriptions.

Source: DEA

6.9 million

There were 6.9 million people who experienced hydrocodone misuse in 2017.

Source: NIDA


Hydrocodone Drug Facts

Hydrocodone

Hydrocodone and acetaminophen combination is used to relieve pain severe enough to require opioid treatment and when other pain medicines did not work well enough or cannot be tolerated.


Brand Names

  • Anexsia
  • Ceta Plus
  • Co-Gesic
  • Dolorex Forte
  • Hycet
  • Lorcet
  • Lortab
  • Maxidone
  • Norco
  • Stagesic
  • Vicodin HP
  • Zydone

Common Side Effects

  • Stomach pain
  • Dry mouth
  • Tiredness
  • Headache
  • Back pain
  • Muscle tightening
  • Difficult, frequent, or painful urination

Serious Side Effects

  • Chest pain
  • Hallucinations
  • Fever
  • Severe muscle stiffness or twitching
  • Loss of coordination
  • Nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, weakness, or dizziness
  • Inability to get or keep an erection
  • Irregular menstruation
  • Decreased sexual desire
What does a hydrocodone pill look like?  Hydrocodone was first patented in 1923, and the long-acting formulation was approved in the U.S. in 2013. Because of its high potential for abuse, hydrocodone is subject to certain controls including a requirement that patients have a written prescription from their doctor each time it is filled.
What does a hydrocodone pill look like? Hydrocodone was first patented in 1923, and the long-acting formulation was approved in the U.S. in 2013. Because of its high potential for abuse, hydrocodone is subject to certain controls including a requirement that patients have a written prescription from their doctor each time it is filled.

What are the Effects of Hydrocodone Addiction?

Hydrocodone addiction can have a wide range of physical, psychological, and social effects on an individual. Some common effects of Hydrocodone addiction include:

  • Physical effects: Hydrocodone can cause physical changes in the body, such as respiratory depression, nausea, vomiting, constipation, and decreased heart rate. Long-term abuse of Hydrocodone can lead to liver damage, kidney damage, and gastrointestinal problems.
  • Psychological effects: Hydrocodone addiction can lead to changes in mood, behavior, and thought processes. Common psychological effects of Hydrocodone addiction include anxiety, depression, irritability, confusion, and impaired judgment.
  • Social effects: Hydrocodone addiction can have negative consequences on an individual’s social life, relationships, and work or school performance. It can lead to social isolation, financial problems, legal issues, and difficulties maintaining employment or academic performance.
  • Tolerance and withdrawal: With continued use, an individual can develop tolerance to the effects of Hydrocodone, which means they need higher doses to achieve the same effect. Withdrawal symptoms can occur if an individual abruptly stops taking the medication, which can include agitation, anxiety, sweating, chills, and muscle aches.
  • Overdose: Hydrocodone abuse can also lead to overdose, which can be life-threatening. Signs of Hydrocodone overdose include extreme drowsiness, slowed breathing, confusion, and loss of consciousness.

It’s important to seek professional help if you or someone you know is struggling with Hydrocodone addiction to prevent the potential negative effects on physical and mental health, relationships, and overall quality of life.

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Hydrocodone Addiction

Hydrocodone is a highly addictive prescription pain medication that belongs to the opioid class of drugs. It is commonly prescribed to relieve moderate to severe pain, but its addictive properties make it a potential drug of abuse. Hydrocodone addiction occurs when a person becomes physically and psychologically dependent on the drug and continues to use it despite the negative consequences it may cause.

Why is Hydrocodone Addictive?

Hydrocodone is addictive because it affects the brain’s reward system, causing a release of dopamine and producing feelings of pleasure and euphoria. The drug binds to opioid receptors in the brain and central nervous system, which reduces pain signals and produces a sense of relaxation. Repeated use of hydrocodone can lead to tolerance, which means that higher doses of the drug are required to achieve the same effects. This can lead to physical dependence, where the body adapts to the presence of the drug and experiences withdrawal symptoms when it is stopped.

Signs of Hydrocodone Addiction

Some signs of hydrocodone addiction may include:

  • Taking larger doses of the drug than prescribed or using it more frequently than directed.
  • Continuing to use hydrocodone despite negative consequences, such as health problems or legal issues.
  • Spending a significant amount of time and money obtaining, using, and recovering from the effects of the drug.
  • Neglecting responsibilities, such as work or family obligations, due to hydrocodone use.
  • Experiencing withdrawal symptoms, such as nausea, sweating, anxiety, and insomnia, when attempting to stop using hydrocodone.

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Common Prescription Drugs That Contain Hydrocodone

Hydrocodone is often combined with other drugs, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, to enhance its pain-relieving effects. Some common combinations include:

  • Hydrocodone-acetaminophen (Vicodin, Norco) – This combination drug contains hydrocodone and acetaminophen, which work together to relieve pain. However, taking too much acetaminophen can cause liver damage, so it’s important to follow the recommended dosage.
  • Hydrocodone-ibuprofen (Vicoprofen) – This combination drug contains hydrocodone and ibuprofen, which is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that can help reduce pain and inflammation.
  • Hydrocodone-aspirin (Lortab ASA) – This combination drug contains hydrocodone and aspirin, which is another NSAID that can help relieve pain and reduce inflammation.
  • Hydrocodone-homatropine (Hycodan) – This combination drug contains hydrocodone and homatropine, which is used to treat cough and cold symptoms.

Can You Mix Hydrocodone and Alcohol?

It is not recommended to mix hydrocodone and alcohol as it can be dangerous and potentially life-threatening. Both hydrocodone and alcohol can cause central nervous system depression, which can lead to slowed breathing, decreased heart rate, and loss of consciousness.

Mixing these substances can also increase the risk of liver damage and other negative health consequences. Additionally, both hydrocodone and alcohol can impair judgment and coordination, making it unsafe to operate machinery or drive while under their influence.

What do hydrocodone pills look like? Hydrocodone is an opioid that suppresses pain signals in the brain and spinal cord. Acetaminophen, also known as Tylenol, is a non-opioid pain reliever that inhibits the production of specific chemicals in the brain.
What do hydrocodone pills look like? Hydrocodone is an opioid that suppresses pain signals in the brain and spinal cord. Acetaminophen, also known as Tylenol, is a non-opioid pain reliever that inhibits the production of specific chemicals in the brain.

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What is the Difference Between Hydrocodone and Oxycodone?

Hydrocodone and oxycodone are both prescription opioids used to treat pain, but there are some differences between the two medications.

  • Chemical Composition: Hydrocodone is a semi-synthetic opioid derived from codeine, while oxycodone is a fully synthetic opioid.
  • Potency: Oxycodone is generally considered to be more potent than hydrocodone, meaning that a smaller dose of oxycodone may be needed to achieve the same level of pain relief as a larger dose of hydrocodone.
  • Availability: Hydrocodone is typically combined with other medications such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen and is available in both immediate-release and extended-release formulations. Oxycodone is available in both immediate-release and extended-release formulations but is usually prescribed on its own without additional medications.
  • Approved Uses: Hydrocodone is primarily used to treat moderate to severe pain, while oxycodone is used to treat moderate to severe pain as well as chronic pain.
  • Side Effects: Both medications can cause similar side effects such as nausea, dizziness, and constipation, but oxycodone is more likely to cause respiratory depression, especially when used in higher doses.

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Hydrocodone Abuse Treatments

Prescription Drug Abuse Treatment NJ 

There is a strong link between mental health and prescription drug abuse. Individuals who struggle with mood disorders like depression and anxiety are more susceptible to developing an addiction to drugs or alcohol, often to self-medicate symptoms of their underlying mental health condition. These co-occurring disorders can make each other worse without proper treatment.

To determine the most effective ways to treat polysubstance, it’s crucial to first get an accurate assessment of all the symptoms. When the symptoms have been evaluated by a mental health professional, it may be determined that another form of mental condition is present and needs a particular type of treatment. Very often, some combination of psychotherapy, medication, and/or lifestyle changes are effective for coping with functional.

Detox Treatment in New Jersey Rehab Center

The first step in treatment is a medical detox. It will help you navigate the complicated withdrawal process, but it doesn’t address patterns of thought and behavior that contribute to drug abuse. Various treatment approaches and settings can help provide the ongoing support necessary to maintain long-term sobriety after your complete detox.

Cravings are very common during detox and can be challenging to overcome. This often leads to relapse. Constant medical care provided during inpatient treatment helps prevent relapse. Clinicians can provide the necessary medication and medical expertise to lessen cravings and the effects of withdrawals.

Psychotherapy

Several different modalities of psychotherapy have been used in the treatment of depression, including:

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) – is an effective treatment that involves making changes in both the patterns of negative thoughts and the behavioral routines which are affecting the daily life of the depressed person for various forms of depression. 
  • Dialectical Behavioral Therapy – is a comprehensive mental health and substance abuse treatment program whose ultimate goal is to aid patients in their efforts to build a life worth living. The main goal of DBT is to help a person develop what is referred to as a “clear mind.” 
  • Person-Centered Therapy – is a strategy that allows and encourages clients to understand and resolve their concerns in a safe, supportive environment.
When snorting hydrocodone, an individual feels a high quickly than if they consume it orally. That is why snorting hydrocodone has become so popular. Opioid use disorder can affect anyone. Prescription drug addiction is so common because individuals often believe they are safer than illicit options.  Call us today, and one of our addiction specialists will answer your questions and help get you on the path to healing.
What do hydrocodone look like? Opioid use disorder can affect anyone. Prescription drug addiction is so common because individuals often believe they are safer than illicit options.  Call us today, and one of our addiction specialists will answer your questions and help get you on the path to healing.

Dual Diagnosis Treatment Centers New Jersey

Substance abuse and mental health disorders often co-occur. In many cases, traumatic experiences can result in mental health disorders and substance abuse. Dual diagnosis programs in New Jersey treat both of these issues together. The best approach for the treatment of dual diagnosis is an integrated system. In this strategy, both the substance abuse problem and the mental disorder are treated simultaneously. Regardless of which diagnosis (mental health or substance abuse problem) came first, long-term recovery will depend largely on the treatment for both disorders done by the same team or provider.

Medication-Assisted Treatments

Medication-Assisted Treatments (MAT) for substance use disorders and mental health disorders are commonly used in conjunction with one another. This includes the use of medications and other medical procedures. During your rehab, the staff from your treatment facility will help you identify what caused your addiction and teach you skills that will help you change your behavior patterns and challenge the negative thoughts that led to your addiction. Sometimes, the pressures and problems in your life lead you to rely on substances to help you forget about them momentarily.

Now that we’ve answered the question ”How long does it take for hydrocodone to kick in” and learned about its addictive properties and the risks that come along with its abuse. It is important to reach out for professional help if you or a loved one are struggling with long-term Hydrocodone side effects and addiction. Contact one of our helpful treatment specialists today. We Level Up rehab center in New Jersey can provide information on dual diagnosis and detox programs that may fit your specific needs.

Hydrocodone Addiction Denial Video

Addiction denial is a common psychological defense mechanism used by people with addiction to avoid admitting or accepting that they have a problem with substance abuse or other addictive behaviors. Denial is often a barrier to seeking treatment for addiction, as individuals who deny their addiction may not feel the need to seek help or may resist help when offered.

Overcoming denial is often the first step towards recovery from addiction. It may require a loved one or interventionist to help the individual recognize the severity of their addiction and the need for treatment. In some cases, a period of detoxification may be necessary before a person can begin to address their addiction and work towards recovery.

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Search We Level Up NJ “What Does Hydrocodone Look Like” Topics & Resources
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[2] Hydrocodone: MedlinePlus Drug Information – https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a614045.html – Tag: What Does Hydrocodone Look Like?

[3] Hydrocodone Combination Products: MedlinePlus Drug Information – https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a601006.html – Tag: What Does Hydrocodone Look Like?

[4] Hydrocodone | C18H21NO3 – PubChem (nih.gov) – National Center for Biotechnology Information (2023). PubChem Compound Summary for CID 5284569, Hydrocodone. Retrieved March 20, 2023 from https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/Hydrocodone. – Tag: What Does Hydrocodone Look Like?

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