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How Naproxen and Alcohol Work, Side Effects and Addiction

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Naproxen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicine used to treat fever, rheumatoid arthritis, menstrual cramps, and other inflammatory illnesses. It is also available under the trade names Aleve and other names.

What is Naproxen?

Naproxen is used to treat a variety of pains, including menstrual cramps, tendinitis, headaches, and muscular aches and pains. Additionally, it lessens gout, bursitis, and arthritis-related pain, swelling, and stiffness in the joints. Naproxen and Alcohol are not recommended.

Naproxen is a type of pain reliever called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which include ibuprofen and aspirin. One of the riskiest side effects of NSAIDs like naproxen is that they can increase the bleeding threat. It works by preventing your body from producing certain natural compounds that cause inflammation.

Remember that painkillers function best if they are taken as soon as the first signals of pain appear if you are taking this medicine “as required” (instead of on a regular schedule). The drug might not function as well if you wait until the pain has gotten worse.

How Naproxen Works?

The way naproxen works is by preventing the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes in your body from doing their job. These enzymes participate in the body’s production of prostaglandins, another type of molecule. At the locations of damage or injury, some prostaglandins are created, which lead to pain and inflammation.

The drug is available in three forms: Naproxen, Naproxen sodium, and Naproxen suspension.

Used for: Relief of pain and inflammation

Also called: Naprosyn®; Nexocin®; Vimovo®

Type of medicine: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory

Available as: Tablets and oral liquid medicine

The process by which naproxen is metabolized is rather straightforward; the parent molecule, its oxidative 6-desmethyl metabolite, and their corresponding conjugates are all eliminated almost totally in the urine. Naproxen is an acidic medication that has a strong affinity for plasma albumin.

Naproxen works by preventing COX-1 and COX-2, which are necessary for your body to manufacture the various prostaglandins. Your body has a variety of prostaglandins, some of which are found in practically all bodily tissues. Each of these has distinct results, such as producing:

  • your body’s tissues to become inflamed
  • your blood vessels will loosen up and expand
  • the blood’s platelets to congregate and form a clot

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Can You Drink Alcohol with Naproxen?

Mixing alcohol and naproxen is not recommended. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which also contain ibuprofen and aspirin, are a class of anesthetics that contain naproxen. The risk of bleeding might increase as one of the most hazardous adverse effects of NSAIDs like naproxen.

Alcohol also stops the body’s capability to make blood cells, specifically platelets, which are necessary for clotting. When a person gets a cut, platelets are activated and help stop the bleeding.  Doctors think that Naproxen with alcohol can’t be mixed together because it can increase the risk of bleeding even more when used together than when they are used separately. So mixing alcohol with naproxen may not be safe.

Naproxen Alcohol Interaction

Naproxen and alcohol interaction can interact with many other medications when they are used together, including:

  • ACE Inhibitors
  • Aldosterone antagonists
  • Alendronate
  • Amiloride
  • Aspirin
  • Beta-blockers
  • Brimonidine
  • Calcineurin inhibitors
  • Corticosteroids
  • Cyclosporin
  • Fluconazole
  • Lithium
  • Loop diuretics
  • Methotrexate
  • Phenindione
  • Potassium
  • Prostaglandin analogs
  • Rifampicin
  • Spartans
  • Tacrolimus
  • Thiazide diuretics
  • Thiazolidinediones
  • Triamterene
  • Warfarin

These drugs can frequently be used simultaneously, but your doctor should be aware of this so they can change the dosage as necessary to keep them both safe and effective.

Naproxen and Alcohol Use

Mixing Naproxen with alcohol should be avoided. Alcohol may result in gastrointestinal bleeding from naproxen more likely. If you experience signs of stomach or intestinal bleeding, contact your doctor right away. This involves passing red, tarry, or black feces, as well as coughing up vomit that resembles coffee grounds or blood.

ALCOHOL and NAPROXEN

  • Alcohol is a sedative
  • Naproxen ( Aleve, Naprosyn, and Flanax) is an over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs).

Mixing both can increase bleeding most especially among individuals who have a long history of alcohol abuse.

Naproxen and Alcohol Side Effects

People are more likely to bleed as a result of the adverse effects of alcohol and NSAIDs like naproxen. Therefore, not only do they both increase the likelihood that someone will bleed when they are hurt, but they also increase the likelihood that the body will sustain harm. Frequently, this injury does not manifest on the body’s surface. The most frequent type of injury takes place within the body.

Bleeding

Additionally, alcohol inhibits the body’s capacity to produce blood cells, particularly platelets, which are crucial for clotting. Platelets become active after a wound and aid in stopping the bleeding. Long-term alcohol consumption, however, interferes with the body’s ability to produce new platelets. If someone is hurt and their body is unable to stop the bleeding, they could keep bleeding. Particularly if the bleeding is internal to the body, this scenario may be highly deadly.

Gastritis

Gastritis is one of the most typical adverse effects. An inflammation of the stomach lining is called gastropathy. Both alcohol and naproxen can induce it. As a result, combining alcohol and NSAID use increases the likelihood of developing gastritis compared to doing so alone.

Typically, gastritis causes discomfort. Having the need to vomit or experiencing persistent stomach aches are two common symptoms. Although a person may occasionally have no symptoms at all, this does not indicate that they should cease being concerned about gastrointestinal harm caused by alcohol and naproxen.

Dependence & Addiction

The word “dependency” is typically used to describe a person’s physical reliance on a drug. Tolerance and withdrawal are two characteristics that define dependence. Despite the fact that it is possible to have a physical dependence without also having an addiction, addiction is frequently close by.

Due to the molecular changes in the brain brought on by chronic drug usage, addiction is characterized by a shift in behavior. No of the potential harm to oneself or others, using drugs or alcohol becomes the addict’s first priority. When a person doesn’t have the chemical they are addicted to in their system, they act erratically.

It might be challenging to comprehend the distinction between dependency and addiction. Some organizations use the phrases interchangeably, according to differing definitions, or they may even stop using both titles completely. Due to this inconsistency, several ground principles can assist distinguish between the two words (substance use disorder, or SUD, is a favored term in the scientific community).

Naproxen and Alcohol. The process by which naproxen is metabolized is rather straightforward; the parent molecule, its oxidative 6-desmethyl metabolite, and their corresponding conjugates are all eliminated almost totally in the urine.
Naproxen and Alcohol. The process by which naproxen is metabolized is rather straightforward; the parent molecule, its oxidative 6-desmethyl metabolite, and their corresponding conjugates are all eliminated almost totally in the urine.

Liver Damage

Even though naproxen-associated liver damage is still an uncommon occurrence, it should be taken into account in any patient who develops cholestasis soon after taking the medication. The most typical type of liver damage is a mixed pattern with cholestasis and hepatitis. Years may pass before the ensuing liver damage is repaired.

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Naproxen for Alcohol Withdrawal

While the medication can be taken safely when used as prescribed by the physician, it can cause dependence and tolerance, even if used for a short time. Anyone who is chronically using the drug will experience withdrawal.

Naproxen’s physical withdrawal effects might last up to 60 days or 48–72 hours. The amount and duration of Naprosyn consumption affect the withdrawal symptoms intensity. As the body tries to recuperate from the involvement of Naproxen inside its systems, withdrawal symptoms appear.

Some Of the Aleve Physical Withdrawal Symptoms Include:

  • Severe and repeated episodes of headache that become painful to the extent that vomiting and shivering happen to be a common part of it
  • Fever and flu-like symptoms
  • Nausea with no specific reason before, during, and after having a meal
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Hallucinations

Some Of the Psychological Withdrawal Symptoms Are:

  • Restlessness
  • Irritation
  • Fluctuating mood swings
  • Insomnia

It is risky to stop taking the drug abruptly or without seeing a doctor. Adequate medical care is needed for the management of Naproxen withdrawal symptoms.

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Alcoholism Treatment

For those addicted to taking Naproxen and Alcohol, We Level Up NJ offers a comprehensive plan that includes evidence-based therapies, like cognitive behavioral therapy, which is essential for recovery. Some persons with a substance use disorder may be eligible for treatment at a specialist institution like ours, depending on how badly their Sudafed addiction has affected them.

We employ highly skilled addiction specialists who have undergone training to provide clients with the motivation and resources they badly need to stop consuming alcohol and Sudafed and sustain long-term health and sobriety. We provide diagnostic treatment programs for people with these diseases and co-occurring mental health issues.

If you are facing a Naproxen and Alcohol addiction, contact us immediately to discuss your treatment options and find out how we can help you as you begin your recovery journey. We’ll be by your side the entire time.

We Level Up NJ provides proper care with round-the-clock medical staff to assist your recovery through our medically-assisted detox program. Reclaim your life; call us to speak with one of our treatment specialists. Our counselors know what you are going through and will answer any of your questions.

If you are facing a Naproxen and Alcohol addiction, contact us immediately to discuss your treatment options and find out how we can help you as you begin your recovery journey. We’ll be by your side the entire time.

We Level Up NJ provides proper care with round-the-clock medical staff to assist your recovery through our medically-assisted detox program. Reclaim your life; call us to speak with one of our treatment specialists. Our counselors know what you are going through and will answer any of your questions.

If you are facing a Naproxen and Alcohol addiction, contact us immediately to discuss your treatment options and find out how we can help you as you begin your recovery journey. We’ll be by your side the entire time.
If you are facing a Naproxen and Alcohol addiction, contact us immediately to discuss your treatment options and find out how we can help you as you begin your recovery journey. We’ll be by your side the entire time.

World-class, Accredited, 5-Star Reviewed, Effective Addiction & Mental Health Programs. Complete Behavioral Health Inpatient Rehab, Detox plus Co-occuring Disorders Therapy.

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Recovery from Naproxen and Alcohol addiction, Our team at We Level Up NJ specializes in creating an ideal environment and providing effective therapies.
Recovery from Naproxen and Alcohol addiction, Our team at We Level Up NJ specializes in creating an ideal environment and providing effective therapies.

Finding the Next Level of Treatment At We Level Up NJ

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