Xanax Bars

What Are Xanax Bars?

Xanax is a brand of alprazolam, is a benzodiazepine. It is thought that alprazolam works by enhancing the activity of certain neurotransmitters in the brain. Xanax is prescribed to treat anxiety and anxiety caused by depression. It is also used to treat panic disorders with or without a fear of places and situations that might cause panic, helplessness, or embarrassment (agoraphobia).

Xanax bars, also called “planks,” and “zanies,” are small, pill-sized rectangular Xanax tablets that can be broken down into quarters and taken individually. Each Xanax bar has 2-milligrams per dose, but it becomes 2, 1-milligram pieces of a bar when broken in half. Smaller quantities include 0.5 milligrams and 0.25 milligrams, which is the smallest dose. Xanax bars can cause harmful side effects, overdose, and dependence.

Xanax Bars
The dangers of Xanax bars often affect people who misuse or abuse them. Any form of substance abuse can be dangerous and lead to a variety of health problems.

Someone who has developed a tolerance to a quarter of a Xanax bar often doubles their dosage to 2 small quarter-sized squares. Some take a whole Xanax bar, which can create aggression, irritability, and hyperactive behavior. More symptoms may follow, like low blood pressure, chest pain, drowsiness, and withdrawal symptoms. Nevertheless, many will continue to use Xanax bars and pills to escape withdrawal symptoms such as shaking and panic attacks.

Street Names for Xanax Bars

  • Xannies or Zannies
  • Bars
  • Handlebars
  • Blue Footballs
  • French Fries
  • Benzos
  • Ladders
  • Sticks

Real vs Fake Xanax Bars – What’s The Difference?

It is risky and unsafe to purchase Xanax outside the United States or on the internet. The distribution and sale of prescription drugs outside the U.S. do not comply with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) [1], safe-use regulations. In addition, these medicines may contain dangerous ingredients or may not be distributed by a licensed pharmacy.

Xanax bars are rectangular white pills that are etched with the brand name and typically with the number two to indicate the medication dosage. Fake Xanax bars are also long white pills that are pressed with the brand’s name and the number two. So how can you tell the difference? Unfortunately, the truth is that most individuals aren’t able to visually distinguish between fake vs. real Xanax bars.

Remember, though, that Xanax is still an addictive substance, even when prescribed. This means that even if someone uses the medication exactly as prescribed, they still are at risk of developing a dependence on it. And if someone is in a situation where they cannot legally get Xanax, then they are at great risk for unknowingly taking fake Xanax.

According to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) [2], Xanax bars are a Schedule IV controlled substance. Therefore, it is prohibited to possess Xanax bars without a prescription. One of the most common forms of Xanax is what is called a “bar.” According to the National Institute of Health (NIH)[3]. Xanax bars should be swallowed, do not chew, crush, or break them.

How to Determine if a Xanax Bar Is Fake?

The biggest distinction between fake and real Xanax bars is the ingredients and the side effects. This is because fake Xanax ingredients frequently contain a deadly dose of fentanyl. Usually, fentanyl-laced Xanax bars don’t smell, look, or taste any different than a real Xanax bar. As a result, someone who buys these fake or counterfeit pressed Xanax bars has no clue what they are getting into.

There are fake Xanax bars in different shapes and colors depending on the batch that illegal labs have manufactured. Individuals generally try to determine between phony vs. phony Xanax bars by examining the letters pressed into the pill. Fake Xanax may have letter identifiers pressed into the tablet that looks almost identical to the real thing but might be subtly off.

Unfortunately, identifying bogus Xanax bars or any other mislabeled medication may be challenging for the human eye. This is especially true when a person is struggling with addiction. Seeking out Xanax through illegal means or misusing legally prescribed pills can put one’s life at risk.

Xanax Bars
Using Xanax bar regularly can also lead to physical dependence and addiction. Xanax bar withdrawal can be uncomfortable and often requires a medical detox.

Xanax Bars Interactions

  • Avoid drinking alcohol if you are taking Xanax bars. Dangerous side effects or death could happen.
  • Avoid hazardous activity or driving until you know how this medication will affect you. Drowsiness or dizziness can cause accidents or severe injuries.
  • Grapefruit may interact with Xanax bars and lead to unwanted side effects. Avoid the use of grapefruit products.

The Dangers Of Xanax Bars

Once a person gets used to the calming effect of Xanax bars, they can risk developing a tolerance for the drug and start taking more. Unfortunately, individuals taking Xanax bars often quickly shift from taking a prescribed dosage to doubling, tripling, or even quadrupling up on medicines. Some even combine Xanax bars with other benzodiazepines like Valium or with alcohol and marijuana. Once a person develops a tolerance, they can do irreparable damage to their body.

The Effects Of Xanax Bars

Like most Benzodiazepines, Xanax bars increase the power of GABA, a neurotransmitter that inhibits connectivity among neurons. This effect sedates the nervous system by suppressing neural hyperactivity, the cause of panic and anxiety. As a result, a person who uses a Xanax bar may feel drowsy and relaxed. In some cases, it will cause a person to fall asleep. For this reason, some individuals use Xanax bars to relieve insomnia. Some side-effects include:

  • Fatigue
  • Confusion
  • Dizziness
  • Irritability
  • Enhanced dreams
  • Impaired coordination
  • Loss of appetite or libido
  • Memory loss
  • Muscle pain, twitching, or weakness
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Sleepwalking
  • Slurred speech
  • Depression
  • Addiction
  • Mood Swings
  • Risky behavior

Xanax bars can cause more serious side effects in severe cases, such as fainting, hallucinations, jaundice, convulsions, and seizures. In addition, Alprazolam does not safely interact with Alcohol, other Opioids, Benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, or antihistamines.

A prescription drug does not mean that the medication in question is not dangerous. Even when taking prescription medicines, you have to be careful and understand and follow the directions given to you by your physician. Many individuals develop an addiction to Xanax bars because they take their friend’s or family member’s alprazolam without a prescription. Using a medication that wasn’t prescribed to you is very dangerous. Someone may also begin abusing Xanax bars by taking more medicines than prescribed, snorting it, injecting it, or mixing it with alcohol or drugs or other alcohol.

Xanax Bars Overdose

An overdose on Xanax bars can be life-threatening especially if the substance is taken with alcohol. Alcohol is particularly dangerous when mixed with Xanax bars because they are both Depressants; combining the two can lead to an overdose and respiratory failure.

Overdose deaths involving benzodiazepines (including Xanax bars) increased from 0.58 per 100,000 adults in 1996 to 3.07 in 2010. Moreover, data shows that 11,537 overdose deaths involving benzodiazepines occurred in 2017. This is according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) [4].

Xanax bars should never be combined with other benzodiazepines like, Valium, Klonopin, or Ativan. The effects of each drug can “stack” and increase the chance of overdose. Overdose can also happen if the pills are chewed or crushed, as the drug is designed to be time-released into the system. Xanax overdose symptoms include:

  • Fainting
  • Slowed heart rate
  • Confusion
  • Extreme drowsiness
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Shallow breathing 
  • Muscle weakness
  • Loss of balance
  • Blue lips or nails 
  • Unconsciousness 
  • Coma

Can I take Xanax Bars If I’m Pregnant or Breastfeeding?

Inform your doctor if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. Xanax bars may harm an unborn baby. Avoid taking this medication during the first trimester of pregnancy.

If you use Xanax bars while you are pregnant, your baby could become dependent on the medication. This can cause life-threatening withdrawal symptoms in the baby after it is born. Babies born dependent on habit-forming medicine may need medical treatment for several weeks.

Hopeful mothers misusing Xanax bars can harm unborn babies with fetal developmental problems. Because muscle cramps and anxiety are normal during pregnancy, mothers may be prescribed a benzodiazepine to relax them. Mothers can encounter nausea, tremors, and seizures during Xanax withdrawal. Like other substance abuse disorders, mothers abusing Xanax bars can affect the baby as the chemicals transfer to the baby through the bloodstream.

Physical Symptoms of a Xanax Bar Addiction

Some of the physical symptoms of Xanax bar addiction are also similar to those of other drugs. Because of this, it can sometimes be hard to recognize which drug your loved one is abusing.

The symptoms are more severe if the person takes higher doses of Xanax and takes it more often.

  • Tiredness
  • Irritability
  • Constipation
  • Constant fatigue
  • Headaches
  • Blurred vision
  • Unusual sleeping times
  • Nausea

Psychological Symptoms of a Xanax Bar Addiction

A person suffering from Xanax bar addiction will exhibit certain physical, psychological, and behavioral symptoms, including:

Depression

  • People who take Xanax have reported feeling deeply depressed and mentally uneasy.

Anxiety

  • Anxiety can be described by uncontrollable and uneasy thoughts one feels. These thoughts can lead the person down a “rabbit hole” where the mind creates problems that cause distress and pain. Another concern is that the anxiety symptoms the Xanax is designed to treat could return in amplified intensity when the medication is stopped.

Insomnia

  • Overtaken by stress and anxiety, a person who is in withdrawal from this drug may have problems falling asleep at night.

Mood Swings

  • Random shifts in mood, such as quickly going from feeling euphoric to being depressed.

Suicidal Thinking

  • Stress, anxiety, and intense nervousness that can happen during withdrawal can lead to or coexist with suicidal thoughts.

Difficulty Concentrating

  • People can have cognitive issues for weeks after stopping Xanax.

Memory Problems

  • Long-term Xanax addiction can lead to dementia and memory problems in the short term. Typically, memory functioning is restored within a few months of the initial withdrawal.

Find the Right Treatment Plan at We Level NJ

During your rehabilitation, the staff from We Level Up NJ will help you identify what caused your Xanax bar misuse and teach you skills that will help you change your behavior patterns and challenge the negative thoughts that led to your addiction. Sometimes, the pressures and problems in your life lead you to rely on substances to help you forget about them momentarily [5].

If you or someone you love is struggling with Xanax abuse, get them the safest help they need and deserve. We Level Up NJ offers a safe and medically-assisted Xanax Addiction treatment program. Contact our team today!

Xanax Bar
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Sources:

[1] FDA – https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2011/018276s044,021434s006lbl.pdf

[2] DEA – https://www.dea.gov/factsheets/benzodiazepines

[3] NIH – https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a684001.html

[4] CDC – https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhsr/nhsr137-508.pdf

[5] We Level UpBenzo Detox