Mushrooms Drug

Mushrooms Drug

Mushrooms Drug, Classification, Drug Slang, Effects, Risks, & Treatment

What is Mushroom Drug?

The mushroom drug, commonly known as “magic mushrooms” or “shrooms” is a slang term for mushrooms containing psilocybin and psilocin, a psychoactive drug or substances that cause visual and auditory hallucinations. People may eat shrooms or brew them in tea to get “high”. When one eats mushrooms drug, the Psilocybin in them breaks down into the active ingredient called psilocin. Psilocin acts as a blocking agent, and in this case, it prevents the reuptake of the neurotransmitter called serotonin. As a result, it means that psilocin can bind and stimulate the receptors in the brain. This triggered the so-called “shroom trip”. How long do shrooms last? Mushrooms drug will stay in one’s system for about 15 hours on average.

There are about forty different species of psychoactive mushrooms, with most of them found in the United States, Central America, and Mexico. Although they have historically been used for medicinal purposes and spiritual rituals, they are widely abused today for their psychedelic effects alongside other hallucinogen drugs like ecstasy and LSD [1]. They are also frequently abused at music festival events.

Consuming shrooms can create an intense user experience with quick and long-lasting effects. Most users begin to feel the euphoric effects of mushrooms drug within 30 minutes of taking them, and the effects last for about six hours. However, some users may continue to feel the side effects for days after taking the mushrooms drug. The psychological consequences of using these drugs include hallucinations and an inability to discern reality from fantasy. psychotic-like episodes and panic reactions also may occur, particularly if a user ingests a high dose.

Mushrooms Drug
Psilocybin is a chemical obtained from certain
types of fresh or dried mushrooms.

Mushroom Drug Classification

Psilocybin is a Schedule I substance under the Controlled Substances Act, meaning that it has a high potential for abuse, no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States, and a lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision [2]. In an evaluation of the safety and abuse research on the drug in hallucinogenic mushrooms, Johns Hopkins researchers suggest that if it clears phase III clinical trials, psilocybin should be re-categorized from a schedule I drug—one with no known medical potential—to a schedule IV drug such as prescription sleep aids, but with tighter control.

Following the Controlled Substances Act of 1970, any drug with the potential for abuse is categorized based on criteria that take into account whether the drug has accepted medical use, its safety, and the potential for abuse. Although preliminary research studies suggest that psilocybin may be effective for smoking cessation and for disorders such as cancer-specific depression and anxiety, it must clear phase III clinical trials before the Food and Drug Administration can be petitioned to reclassify it.

Although psilocybin, the substance that causes hallucinations in mushrooms drug, is relatively less harmful than other drugs and not prone to compulsive abuse, the researchers don’t recommend releasing psilocybin into patients’ hands even with a prescription. They believe that the conditions should be tightly controlled and that when taken for a clinical reason, it should be administered in a health care setting monitored by a person trained for that situation.

Mushroom Drug Slang 

There are over 200 species of mushroom that contain psychedelic chemicals including 180 that specifically have psilocybin or psilocin—each one has its own unique Latin name. Mycologists (a scientist who works on studying different types of fungi ) use Latin to name different mushrooms and categorize them. For example, the scientific name for the most common mushrooms drug is Psilocybe cubensis. This particular mushroom belongs to the genus Psilocybe, the genus which includes the greatest amount of psychedelic mushrooms. The term “cubensis” indicates the exact species; there are at least 245 distinct species in the psilocybe genus, and not all of them contain the psychedelic compound, psilocybin.   

Yet, no matter the species, all psychedelic mushrooms are lumped together under the umbrella of “Magic Mushrooms” in Western popular culture. But, that’s certainly not the only slang term for these psychedelic fungi. Other slang for mushrooms include: 

  • Shrooms 
  • Mushies 
  • Caps 
  • Boomers
  • Pizza toppings
  • Agaric
  • Amani
  • Liberties
  • Liberty Caps
  • Magics
  • Philosopher’s Stones

And of course, different mushrooms drug species have their own nicknames as well—Golden Caps, Blue Meanies, Penis Envy, to name a few.

Shroom slang follows similar patterns to other words that have popped up around other psychedelics, like LSD and DMT. Yet, while the terms might be similar, the actual experiences of those labels can vary widely between drugs. When it comes to mushrooms drug, here are a few words worth knowing:

Tripping 

Tripping is a catch-all term for the feelings, experiences, visuals, or hallucinations that occur after taking a psychedelic drug like LSD or mushrooms. It has been called a ‘trip’ since the late 1920s and really came into popularity around the psychedelic explosion in the 1960s. 

It is called a trip because users feel like the drugs transport them to a different place, plane, state, or setting in their mind; like going on a long journey and returning to reality when the drug wears off.

Flipping

Flipping is a slang term used for mixing a psychedelic with MDMA. The term is not usually used on its own but in conjunction with other slang terms to identify the psychedelic. Hippie Flipping is using psilocybin mushrooms with MDMA, Candyflipping is mixing LSD with MDMA, and Kitty Flipping is mixing MDMA with Ketamine—all risky endeavors. The more substances added to a psychedelic cocktail, the greater the risk of unwanted drug interactions, which can be fatal in some circumstances.

Visuals

 Visuals are the reality distortions and hallucinations experienced through your visual—and cognitive—senses after a psychedelic dosage. These can include subtle changes like the swaying of stationary trees and vibrate saturated colors. They can even include the shapes and patterns seen even when your eyes are closed. They are usually more subtle than the visual hallucinations of other psychedelics like LSD at similar dosages.

Ego Death

Ego Death is the complete loss of subjective self-identity. It is a dissolution of a person’s sense of self; body and mind. This unique experience is related to the “mystical-type” experiences that psilocybin mushrooms can occasion. Yet, a person usually has to take a very large dose of mushrooms drug to achieve this effect. Not all ego death is positive, however. Negative ego dissolution occurs when anxiety, loss of control, and other difficult emotions accompany a loss of identity.

Bad Trip

Not all journeys follow a smooth road. Like all psychedelics, psilocybin can sometimes precipitate a bad trip, a frightening and uncomfortable experience triggered by the drug. Consumers may feel intense anxiety during a bad trip. They may also experience feelings of fear, panic, and disorientation. 

Shroom Stomach

A shroom stomach is a specific, non-psychological, symptom of consuming mushrooms. Nausea, cramps, other stomach pains, and sometimes vomiting are among the most common side effects of magic mushrooms. Many people experience a shroom stomach within 20 to 40 minutes after eating magic mushrooms, as the fungi make their way through the intestinal tract.

Mushrooms Drug
Hallucinogen persisting perception disorder (HPPD) occurs when a person experiences hallucinations or visual disturbances long after using a hallucinogenic drug.

How It Looks, Tastes and Smells

Many poisonous mushrooms look very similar to ‘magic mushrooms’ and it’s easy for pickers to mistake them. People have fallen severely sick or even died from eating a poisonous mushroom.

Mushrooms drug-containing psilocybin are available dried or fresh and have long, slender stems topped by caps with dark gills on the underside. Fresh mushrooms drug has white or whitish-gray stems; the caps are dark brown around the edges and light brown or white in the center. Dried mushrooms drug are typically rusty brown with isolated areas of off-white.

Magic mushrooms can taste very different depending on the mushroom species and other variables. Furthermore, what they taste like to one person can often be different than how someone else perceives their taste. Some report that mushrooms drug have a characteristic earthy, woody, or musty (damp) flavor that is usually present but may occasionally be complemented by almond, coconut, vanilla, and violet notes; others find them almost tasteless.

How Do People Take It? 

Psilocybin mushrooms’ drugs are ingested orally. They may also be brewed as tea or added to other foods to mask their bitter flavor. Magic mushrooms should be consumed with caution because the positive or negative effect on the user can be profound (and uncontrolled) and long-lasting, People tripping on psilocybin can experience paranoia or a complete loss of subjective self-identity, known as ego dissolution. 

Mushrooms Drugs Effects 

If a person is abusing magic mushrooms, they will likely experience some side effects. The side effects of magic mushroom abuse often include:

  • Enhanced senses
  • Feelings of floating
  • Euphoria
  • Visual and auditory hallucinations
  • Reduced inhibitions
  • Altered perceptions of time and reality
  • Feeling mentally “enlightened”
  • Distorted sights, sounds, or images
  • Mood swings

Many individuals abuse magic mushrooms for euphoric feelings, trippy hallucinations, and enhanced perceptions, but there are also many negative side effects of magic mushroom abuse [3]. These may include:

  • Nausea
  • Increased heart rate
  • Psychosis
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Anxiety
  • Chills
  • Paranoia
  • Insomnia
  • Excessive sweating
  • Weakness
  • Lack of coordination
  • Muscle spasms
  • Numbness
  • Dry mouth

When used in very high dosages, magic mushrooms may also cause:

  • Depression
  • Panic
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Hallucinogen persisting perception disorder (HPPD)
  • Flashbacks
  • Overdose

Mushroom Drug Effects on Brain 

The immediate effects of magic mushrooms come from the body breaking down psilocybin into psilocin. Psilocin acts in the brain similarly to other hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamide, also known as LSD. Very high doses can make one have “a bad trip“. In such instances, affected users will experience harrowing negative emotions coupled with vivid hallucinations during this trip. Anxiety and panic attacks are common with users experiencing a bad shroom trip. During such a state, an intoxicated person can be a hazard to own health, others, and even property.

Mental Health Risks 

The mental effects of mushrooms drug may include:

  • Auditory hallucinations (during the ‘trip’ they perceive sound where there is none)
  • Confusion (they believe they can see music or hear colors)
  • Dyschronometria (inability to tell what amount of time has passed between start and end of the trip)
  • Altered mood
  • Poor coordination
  • Lightheadedness
  • Anxiety
  • Confusion and disorientation
  • Panic attacks and paranoia

Are Mushrooms Drug Addictive?

There is no clear answer as to whether a mushroom drug is addictive or not because there’s no research that shows the mushroom drug is physically addictive, like heroin or some other illicit drugs. Although there has been some debate over this issue. After using psilocybin mushrooms consistently for a few days, some users may not feel addicted while others may begin to crave more of it. Psilocybin mushrooms are often mixed with other hallucinogens like LSD. For this reason, users are more likely to develop a psychological dependence on mushrooms drug rather than a physical dependence.

The severity of psychological dependence usually depends on the frequency of use and amount of mushrooms someone consumed. Someone abusing mushrooms drug can become dependent by believing that they need the drug to maintain a sense of enlightenment or happiness. 

Although psilocybin mushrooms may not be considered habit-forming or addictive, they may cause psychological addiction. Some users may also experience a period of psychological withdrawal after using mushrooms drug, during which they may have trouble determining what is real and what is not.

If a person has combined mushrooms drug with other substances like benzos, alcohol, stimulants, or opioids, a medically-assisted detox is needed for recovery. Medically-assisted detox would help the person using multiple drugs stop further abuse and addiction to other substances before they worsen. In addition, detox would include cutting-edge medication to clean the body of harmful substances with polydrug use.

We level Up NJ is offering exceptional evidence-based recovery treatment programs. The combinations of therapies applied for each client are tailored to their individualized needs in treating drug dependency and addiction. We provide cutting-edge full-service rehabilitation care, including residential inpatient, medically assisted detox to drugs, alcohol addiction, and co-occurring mental health therapy.

Mushrooms Drug
In people with pre-existing mental disorders, Mushrooms drug use can produce unprecedented effects. 
Sources:

[1] NIDA – https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/hallucinogens

[2] DEA – https://www.dea.gov/sites/default/files/2020-06/Psilocybin-2020.pdf