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The Dangers of Mixing Adderall and Alcohol. Alcohol and Adderall Interaction. Can You Overdose on Adderall and Alcohol? Adderall and Alcohol Side Effects Treatment.

Many people abuse Adderall recreationally for their stimulant-associated effects of increased energy and euphoria. many also attempt to mix Adderall and alcohol. However, Adderall can suppress the side effects of alcohol and can lead to alcohol poisoning. Continue to read more about the effects of mixing Adderall and alcohol.


Mixing Adderall and Alcohol

Can you drink with Adderall? Alcohol and Adderall should never be combined. And what happens when you drink on Adderall? Alcohol can increase the effects of Adderall, putting you at risk of adverse health effects such as confusion, dizziness, impaired judgment, increased heart rate, and decreased coordination. Drinking in combination with Adderall can also cause damage to the liver. To avoid any harmful effects, you should avoid taking alcohol and Adderall at the same time.

Taking Adderall and alcohol can also cause damage to the liver. To avoid any harmful effects, you should avoid taking Adderall and alcohol simultaneously. Because Adderall is designed to help the brains of people with ADHD, misusing the drug may increase the risk of Adderall’s side effects.

What is Adderall?

Uses

Adderall Uses

Adderall is a prescription medication that combines amphetamine and dextroamphetamine, both central nervous system stimulants. It is primarily prescribed to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. These stimulants increase neurotransmitters in the brain, improving focus, attention, and impulse control in individuals with ADHD and helping manage excessive daytime sleepiness in those with narcolepsy.

Directions for Taking Adderall 

Take Adderall exactly as prescribed by a healthcare professional. This typically means following the recommended dosage and timing instructions, including taking it in the morning and avoiding late-day doses to prevent sleep disturbances.

Communicating regularly with your healthcare provider to ensure the medication works effectively and to discuss any potential side effects or concerns is essential. Also, never share Adderall with others, and store it securely away from children and unauthorized individuals.

List of Adderall Uses

An Adderall prescription serves several purposes:

  • Treatment of Medical Conditions: The primary purpose of an Adderall prescription is to treat specific medical conditions, such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. It helps individuals with ADHD by improving focus, attention, and impulse control, while for those with narcolepsy, it helps manage excessive daytime sleepiness.
  • Symptom Management: Adderall aims to alleviate the symptoms associated with these conditions, thereby enhancing an individual’s daily functioning and quality of life.
  • Personalized Treatment: An Adderall prescription is tailored to the patient’s unique needs, including the specific dosage and timing of the medication. It considers the individual’s medical history, age, and response to the treatment.
  • Monitoring and Adjustments: A prescription allows monitoring of the patient’s progress and potential side effects. Healthcare providers can adjust the dosage or treatment plan to optimize results and minimize adverse effects.
  • Legal Access: A prescription provides legal access to Adderall, classified as a controlled substance. It ensures the medication is obtained through legitimate channels and used under medical supervision.

For individuals with an Adderall prescription, use the medication as directed by their healthcare provider and maintain open communication about the progress and any concerns during follow-up appointments.

Side Effects

Adderall Side Effects

Adderall Side Effects Table

Here is a table outlining both common and severe side effects associated with Adderall (amphetamine/dextroamphetamine):

Type of Side EffectCommon Side EffectsSevere Side Effects
Central Nervous SystemInsomnia, nervousness, restlessness, increased heart rate, dizzinessCardiovascular events (e.g., increased blood pressure, heart problems), hallucinations, seizures, aggressive behavior, mood changes
GastrointestinalDry mouth, loss of appetite, weight loss, upset stomachAbdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, constipation
PsychiatricIrritability, mood swings, anxietyPsychotic symptoms (hallucinations, delusional thinking), aggressive behavior, suicidal thoughts
NeurologicalHeadache, blurred vision, tremorsSeizures, motor or verbal tics (Tourette’s syndrome)
CardiovascularIncreased blood pressure, palpitationsHeart attack, stroke, sudden death (rare but serious)
SexualSexual dysfunction, changes in libidoPriapism (prolonged and painful erection), changes in sexual desire or performance
MiscellaneousSweating, weight lossAllergic reactions (rare), circulatory problems in fingers and toes (Raynaud’s phenomenon)
Table of Common and Severe Side Effects of Adderall
Adderall and Alcohol Side Effects

Alcohol and Adderall side effects can vary among individuals; not everyone will experience them similarly. The severity of side effects can also depend on factors like the dose of Adderall and the amount of alcohol consumed.

Common Side EffectsSevere Side Effects
Increased heart rateHeart palpitations or irregular heartbeat
High blood pressureChest pain or angina
Nervousness or restlessnessSevere anxiety or panic attacks
Jitteriness or tremorsSeizures or convulsions
Dizziness or lightheadednessLoss of consciousness
Insomnia or difficulty sleepingSevere drowsiness or stupor
HeadacheRespiratory distress or difficulty breathing
Nausea or vomitingHallucinations or delirium
Dry mouthExtreme agitation or aggression
Decreased appetiteIncreased aggression or violent behavior
Impaired judgmentImpaired motor skills or coordination
Impaired concentration or memoryRisk of overdose and alcohol poisoning
Table of Adderall with Alcohol Side Effects. Mixing Adderall and alcohol is strongly discouraged due to the potential for dangerous interactions and adverse effects. If you or someone you know is experiencing severe side effects after combining these substances, seek immediate medical attention.
Interactions

Alcohol and Adderall Interactions

Most people are familiar with the relaxing effects of alcohol. As a result, alcohol is favored in social settings because people feel more relaxed, self-confident, and friendly while under its influence. However, drinking too much alcohol in a short time can lead to alcohol poisoning, which is a medical emergency. 

The effects of both drugs only last for a few hours, but prolonged use can cause long-term organ damage, such as severe liver problems and memory issues. When used in conjunction, it can provoke alcohol and Adderall liver damage. Many online mediums and entertainment signify the prevalence of substance misuse, such as Alcohol and Adderall songs. While singing these songs may be harmless, the substances are not.

Those who mix these two powerful substances may be unaware of the risks of combining them. Here are some of the adverse effects of combining Adderall and alcohol:

Adderall Interactions

This is not an exhaustive list. Consult with a healthcare professional for personalized advice based on individual health conditions and medications being taken:

Drug ClassInteractions with Adderall
Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs)Potential for hypertensive crisis (high blood pressure). A washout period is required before starting Adderall.
Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs)Increased risk of serotonin syndrome (elevated serotonin levels) can be severe. Close monitoring is advised.
Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCAs)Increased risk of cardiovascular effects.
Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs)Increased risk of serotonin syndrome. Close monitoring is advised.
Antihypertensive MedicationsPotential for reduced antihypertensive effects. Blood pressure should be closely monitored.
AntacidsReduced absorption of Adderall, leading to decreased effectiveness.
Acidifying Agents (e.g., ascorbic acid)Increased absorption of Adderall, potentially leading to increased side effects.
Alkalinizing Agents (e.g., sodium bicarbonate)Decreased absorption of Adderall, potentially reducing effectiveness.
Anticoagulants (e.g., warfarin)Adderall may increase the effects of anticoagulants, leading to an increased risk of bleeding.
Anticonvulsant MedicationsAdderall may increase the risk of seizures, especially in individuals with a history of seizures. Close monitoring is advised.
Antipsychotic MedicationsIncreased risk of serotonin syndrome. Close monitoring is advised.
AntihistaminesIncreased risk of cardiovascular effects.
Antibiotics (e.g., erythromycin)Increased risk of serotonin syndrome (elevated serotonin levels) can be serious. Close monitoring is advised.
Antifungal Medications (e.g., ketoconazole)Increased blood levels of Adderall potentially leading to increased side effects.
Table of Adderall Interactions
Alcohol Interactions
Medication ClassInteractions with Alcohol
Central Nervous System DepressantsIncreased risk of central nervous system depression, drowsiness, and impaired coordination.
Antidepressants (e.g., SSRIs, TCAs)Increased risk of sedation and drowsiness. Alcohol can exacerbate the side effects of these medications.
AntipsychoticsIncreased risk of sedation and drowsiness. Alcohol can enhance the central nervous system depressant effects.
Anxiolytics (e.g., benzodiazepines)Increased risk of sedation and respiratory depression. Combined use can lead to severe drowsiness and impaired cognitive function.
Stimulant Medications (e.g., Adderall)Alcohol may reduce the effectiveness of stimulant medications and increase the risk of cardiovascular effects.
AnticonvulsantsAlcohol can increase the sedative effects of anticonvulsants, leading to drowsiness and impaired coordination.
Anticoagulants (e.g., warfarin)Increased risk of bleeding, as alcohol can interfere with blood clotting.
Opioid Pain MedicationsEnhanced sedative effects and increased risk of respiratory depression.
Muscle RelaxantsIncreased risk of sedation, drowsiness, and impaired motor function.
AntihistaminesEnhanced sedative effects and impaired cognitive function.
Acetaminophen (Tylenol)Increased risk of liver damage, as both alcohol and acetaminophen can be hepatotoxic.
Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)Increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and ulcers.
AntibioticsInteractions can vary. Some antibiotics may interact with alcohol, leading to nausea, vomiting, and other side effects.
Antifungal MedicationsInteractions can vary. Some antifungal medications may interact with alcohol, leading to nausea, vomiting, and other side effects.
Table of Alcohol Interactions.
Adderall Alcohol Interaction

Here is a list of Adderall and Alcohol Effects:

  • While under the influence of Adderall and alcohol, the person has a decreased capacity to make sound judgments, possibly leading to dangerous impulsivity or high-risk behaviors.
  • Impairment by the alcohol may not be recognized because of the Adderall in the system, possibly leading to an accident or injury.
  • Adverse effects of the Adderall and alcohol combination include heart palpitations, convulsions, increased body temperature, and tremors.
  • Seizures are more likely to happen when Adderall and alcohol are used simultaneously.
  • Overdose can happen when the person can’t perceive the actual effects of the substances. They may not experience the Adderall or the alcohol’s full effect and continue to use them, potentially leading to an overdose.
  • Both Adderall and alcohol can cause hallucinations or psychosis at higher doses.
Polydrug Abuse Risks of Adderall and Alcohol
  • The possibility of developing a polydrug use disorder increases with continued use of Adderall and alcohol.
  • Despite the perception that reflexes and motor coordination are not as affected by alcohol when one mixes Adderall and alcohol, individuals remain significantly impaired regarding their reaction time, motor coordination, and visual perception. This can lead to several potentially dangerous situations.
  • The potential to develop severe neurological effects, particularly seizures, is significantly heightened when one combines the two substances.
  • Long-term misuse of Adderall and alcohol can lead to severe cognitive issues that reflect damage to the central nervous system. These issues often manifest as attention/concentration, learning and memory, and complex problem-solving. In addition, some emotional effects that may damage the central nervous system may also occur, including longstanding issues with depression, apathy, loss of motivation, and even potential psychosis.
  • Even though one of the primary reasons that individuals give for abusing Adderall is to enhance their ability to study, learn, and improve their grades, research indicates that individuals who use Adderall, or who abuse Adderall and alcohol simultaneously, typically have lower performance and significantly lower levels of academic and professional achievement than individuals who do not abuse these drugs. Thus, even though the primary reason that many individuals report using stimulants like Adderall is to enhance their cognitive capabilities, this alleged effect seems to be a myth.
Warnings

Adderall and Alcohol Abuse Warnings

The truth is that alcohol is a depressant, and Adderall is a stimulant. It’s expected to think they cancel out, but in reality, these two substances butt heads. The conflict between them often results in:

  • Lowering someone’s inhibitions and making them more inclined to risky behavior.
  • They have more difficulty focusing on what’s happening around them.
  • Decreased impulse control.

But that’s not all that happens when mixing Adderall and alcohol. Adderall carries an increased risk for heart problems, such as a rapid heart rate and high blood pressure. But, add alcohol into the equation, and the risk factor for these side effects skyrockets. The bottom line? Mixing Adderall and alcohol can cause long-term damage to the heart.

Yes, mixing Adderall and alcohol can kill you. Although this may seem disturbing, the risk of overdose is increased when several drugs or substances are taken at a time. Also, as previously mentioned, because Adderall and alcohol belong to different drug classes, they can collide to produce unpredictable and dangerous side effects. 

For the same reason, alcohol can lessen the effectiveness of Adderall, prompting the user to take more Adderall to experience the increased focus and alertness it gives. But taking Adderall with alcohol doesn’t reduce the original amount of the drug taken, but it only dulls its effects. When someone takes more, they open themselves up to an overdose.

Overdose

Alcohol Adderall Overdose

An overdose involving the combination of alcohol and Adderall can be hazardous and potentially life-threatening.

If you suspect someone is experiencing an overdose involving alcohol and Adderall, it is crucial to seek immediate medical attention by calling emergency services (911). Do not wait for the symptoms to worsen; these situations can quickly become life-threatening.

While waiting for help to arrive, try to keep the person awake and sitting up if possible, and provide any information about what substances were taken. Never attempt to “sober up” the person with cold showers or other remedies, as these can be ineffective and potentially harmful.

Adderall and Alcohol Overdose Symptoms

Adderall and Alcohol Overdose Symptoms

  • Severe Agitation: Agitation and restlessness to the point of extreme discomfort.
  • Hallucinations: Seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not real.
  • Seizures: Sudden, uncontrolled movements and loss of consciousness.
  • Irregular Heartbeat: Palpitations, rapid heartbeat, or arrhythmias.
  • High Blood Pressure: Severe hypertension.
  • Respiratory Distress: Difficulty breathing or shallow breathing.
  • Loss of Consciousness: Fainting or blacking out.
  • Confusion: Disorientation and mental impairment.
  • Nausea and Vomiting: Severe and persistent nausea and vomiting.
  • Hyperthermia: Elevated body temperature.
Adderall and Alcohol Overdose Treatment

Alcohol and Adderall Overdose Treatment

If you suspect an overdose involving a combination of Adderall and alcohol, follow these simplified steps:

  • Call 911: Dial emergency services immediately for professional medical help.
  • Stay with the Person: Do not leave them alone. Keep the person awake and conscious if possible.
  • Provide Information: Give emergency responders as much information as possible about what substances were taken and in what quantities.
  • Do Not Try to Sober Them Up: Do not attempt to “sober up” the person with cold showers or other remedies, as they can be ineffective and potentially harmful.
  • Wait for Medical Professionals: Allow trained medical professionals to assess and provide the necessary treatment.
  • Follow Medical Advice: Follow the guidance and instructions healthcare providers provide for continued care and recovery after receiving medical treatment.

An overdose involving Adderall and alcohol is a medical emergency, and immediate professional intervention is crucial to ensure the person’s safety and well-being.

Imprint

Recognizing Adderall Imprint

Adderall is available in various strengths and formulations, and each tablet or capsule typically has an imprint or marking to help identify its specific dosage. The imprint will vary depending on the manufacturer and the dosage. Here is a simplified table that provides some examples of standard Adderall imprints:

Adderall DosageImprint Example
5 mg“AD” or “5”
10 mg“AD” or “10”
15 mg“AD” or “15”
20 mg“AD” or “20”
30 mg“AD” or “30”
These are just a few examples, and other imprints are used for generic versions and different formulations of Adderall.

Always check the imprint on your medication and consult your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns about your prescription before combining medications with alcohol.

Reviews

Adderall Reviews

Individual reactions to medication can vary, and Adderall should only be used under the supervision and guidance of a healthcare provider. Also, it’s crucial to adhere to the prescribed dosage and to communicate any side effects or concerns with your healthcare professional to ensure safe and effective use.

Positive User Reviews:

  • Improved Focus and Concentration: Many users report that Adderall has helped them enhance their ability to focus on tasks and improve their concentration, which can be particularly beneficial for those with ADHD.
  • Increased Energy: Some users experience increased energy levels and alertness when taking Adderall, which can help combat fatigue and lethargy.
  • Enhanced Productivity: Users often mention that Adderall helps them become more organized, productive, and efficient in their daily activities.
  • Better Mood: Some individuals find that Adderall can positively impact their mood, reducing symptoms of depression or apathy.

Negative User Reviews:

  • Side Effects: Common side effects like insomnia, increased heart rate, dry mouth, and loss of appetite are frequently mentioned as drawbacks.
  • Potential for Dependence: Some users express concerns about the potential for dependence and withdrawal symptoms when discontinuing Adderall.
  • Individual Variability: People’s experiences with Adderall can vary widely, and what works well for one person may not work the same for another.

Continue to read more about the side effects and dangers of combining Adderall and alcohol.

Do you have questions about Adderall and alcohol abuse or treatment in general? Call our helpline 24/7.

Can You Drink Alcohol and Adderall Together?

Can you drink while on Adderall? There’s a popular misconception when it comes to drinking alcohol on Adderall. Many think that taking Adderall before drinking will help someone keep up their energy. If Adderall stimulates them and alcohol makes them tired, they should balance each other out, right?

This is not the case. Drinking with Adderall has dangerous side effects, such as being more receptive to alcohol poisoning. Also, taking a prescription stimulant like Adderall makes it harder for the body to recognize how much alcohol a person drinks. That simple fact significantly increases the risk of alcohol poisoning.

Many deliberately combine alcohol and Adderall to extend their partying and enhance their drinking experience. However, this behavior is risky as it can lead to severe and potentially fatal outcomes, including alcohol poisoning, heightened anxiety, depression, seizures, and cardiac arrest.

The misuse of Adderall and alcohol has become a popular trend, particularly among young adults and predominantly among college students. Despite being meant for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder treatment (ADHD), Adderall is commonly abused for the alertness and enhanced focus it gives. Like other stimulants, these prescription drugs can produce an energetic high that increases confidence and sociability.

Adderall and Alcohol Side Effects

How long after taking Adderall can I drink alcohol? It is not advisable to drink alcohol while taking any form of Adderall. Combining Adderall and alcohol can have several adverse effects, including:

  • Masking Effects: Adderall is a stimulant, while alcohol is a depressant. Alcohol can mask some of the stimulating effects of Adderall, potentially leading to increased alcohol consumption and a higher risk of alcohol poisoning.
  • Cardiovascular Risks: The combination of a stimulant like Adderall and alcohol can strain the heart, increasing the risk of cardiovascular issues such as high blood pressure and irregular heartbeats.
  • Impaired Judgment: Both substances can impair judgment, leading to risky behaviors and decisions one might not make when sober.
  • Increased Side Effects: You may experience more intense side effects from both substances when they are combined, including increased heart rate, anxiety, and nausea.
  • Psychological Effects: Combining stimulants and depressants can lead to unpredictable psychological effects, such as mood swings or agitation.

Symptoms can depend on a person’s body weight, medical conditions, and history of alcohol usage.

Given these effects, it is strongly recommended to avoid drinking alcohol while taking Adderall. If you have questions or concerns about how Adderall interacts with other substances, consult your healthcare provider for personalized guidance.

Can you drink alcohol while taking Adderall? Because Adderall is designed to help the brains of people with ADHD, misusing the drug, such as mixing Adderall and alcohol, may increase the risk of potentially life-threatening side effects.
Can you drink alcohol while taking Adderall? Because Adderall is designed to help the brains of people with ADHD, misusing the drug, such as mixing Adderall and alcohol, may increase the risk of potentially life-threatening side effects.

Looking for help with substance abuse challenges like Adderall and alcohol addiction? Join thousands of clients who trusted We Level Up NJ for substance abuse treatments. Call 24/7 for more information today. Your call is free and confidential. Access addiction professionals who understand your circumstances and are ready to help.

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Symptoms and Effects of Adderall and Alcohol Infographic

As Adderall is one of the most abused prescription drugs, many attempt to mix Adderall and alcohol, and some tires different ways like smoking it. Continue to read more about the risks of misusing Adderall.
As Adderall is one of the most abused prescription drugs, many attempt to mix Adderall and alcohol, and some tires different ways like smoking it. Continue to read more about the risks of misusing Adderall.

Get addiction counseling that works. Discover professional help from We Level Up New Jersey’s addiction and mental health therapists. Start getting support with a free call to our addiction hotline.

Alcohol and ADHD Meds

Can you drink alcohol on Adderall? Combining ADHD medication and alcohol, such as Adderall or Ritalin, can pose several dangers and risks, including the following:

  • Increased Side Effects: Alcohol and ADHD meds can amplify each other’s side effects, such as dizziness, drowsiness, and impaired coordination. This can lead to accidents, falls, or other mishaps.
  • Cardiovascular Risks: ADHD drugs and alcohol like Adderall can increase heart rate and blood pressure. Combining ADHD meds and alcohol can strain the cardiovascular system, potentially leading to heart problems or arrhythmias.
  • Impaired Judgment: ADHD medications are intended to improve focus and impulse control, but alcohol impairs judgment. Combining alcoholism and ADHD meds can lead to poor decision-making and risky behaviors.
  • Mental Health Effects: Alcohol is a depressant and can worsen symptoms of anxiety or depression, which are common co-occurring conditions with ADHD. It can also interfere with the effectiveness of medications prescribed for these conditions.
  • Liver Function: Both alcohol and some ADHD medications are processed by the liver. Combining them may place additional stress on the liver and affect its function. Adderall liver damage can also occur.
  • Alcohol Poisoning: Alcohol can mask the effects of stimulant medications, leading to excessive alcohol consumption and an increased risk of alcohol poisoning.
Detoxing from Adderall and alcohol abuse is possible, and long-term sobriety is achievable. Contact We Level Up NJ now to get started!
Detoxing from Adderall and alcohol abuse is possible, and long-term sobriety is achievable. Contact We Level Up NJ now to get started!

Given these potential dangers, it is strongly recommended to avoid alcohol while taking ADHD medications. If you have concerns about ADHD and alcoholism or need medication guidance, discussing them with a healthcare provider can offer personalized advice based on your specific condition and treatment plan.

What To Do If You Mix Adderall and Alcohol?

If you have accidentally mixed Adderall and alcohol or suspect someone else has, it is crucial to take the following steps:

  • Seek medical attention: If you or someone you know is experiencing severe symptoms or signs of distress, immediately call emergency services or go to the nearest emergency room.
  • Contact a healthcare professional: Reach out to a healthcare provider or poison control center for guidance on what steps to take, depending on the situation and severity of symptoms.
  • Be honest and provide complete information: When seeking medical advice, be open and honest about the substances consumed, including any medications or drugs. This information is crucial for healthcare professionals to provide appropriate care.

Prevention is always the best approach. Follow the prescribed dosage of Adderall and avoid consuming alcohol if you are taking this medication.

If you have concerns or questions about using Adderall, contact the We Level Up treatment center’s professionals for personalized support. Our Adderall treatment hotline is free and open around the clock to answer your questions.

Adderall and Alcohol Drug Facts

Mixing Adderall and alcohol can lead to over-drinking and related consequences such as alcohol poisoning and risky behavior. 
Mixing Adderall and alcohol can lead to over-drinking and related consequences such as alcohol poisoning and risky behavior. 

Adderall XR and alcohol may be habit-forming, and this medicine is a drug of abuse. Tell your doctor if you have had problems with drug or alcohol abuse. Stimulants have caused stroke, heart attack, and sudden death in people with high blood pressure, heart disease, or a heart defect.

Pronunciation: ADD-ur-all
Generic Name: Amphetamine and Dextroamphetamine
Brand Names: Adderall, Adderall XR, Mydayis
Drug Class: CNS stimulants

Adderall Medication for ADHD and Alcohol Abuse

Mixing prescription drugs with alcohol can be harmful. Alcohol, like some medicines, can make you drowsy, sleepy, or lightheaded. Drinking alcohol while taking prescription drugs can intensify these effects. You may have trouble concentrating or performing mechanical skills. Small amounts of alcohol can make driving dangerous, and when you combine alcohol with certain prescription drugs, you put yourself at even greater risk.

Mixing prescription drugs with alcohol can lead to falls and serious injuries, especially among older people. If you or someone you know is struggling with a prescription drug and alcohol addiction, you must seek assistance. Inpatient addiction rehab provides treatment options for various substance use disorders, including mixing alcohol and prescription drugs and mental health.

56% of U.S. adults over 21 drink alcohol at least once per month. Drinking alcohol in moderation is a safe practice for millions of people. However, about 16 million people in the U.S. struggle with alcohol use disorder. Problem drinking can take many forms, including dependence on drinking, drinking to extreme levels of intoxication, and mixing alcohol with prescription drugs or illegal drugs.

DEA Adderall Drug Fact Sheet

People who use Adderall recreationally are at a very high risk of developing an amphetamine addiction. Snorting Adderall only increases the risks of this drug and addiction. Amphetamine is a potent central nervous system stimulant for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, narcolepsy, and obesity. It is also commonly used as a recreational drug. Below is the publicly available DEA-provided facts sheet for prescription drug abuse awareness.

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Adderall and Alcohol Use Disorder Statistics

Adderall is a combination of amphetamine and dextroamphetamine, two central nervous stimulants that improve focus and reduce impulsivity by increasing dopamine and norepinephrine levels in the brain. Unfortunately, it is remarkable that the prevalence of problematic use of amphetamines and stimulants has been rising in older people. Prescription substance abuse in this population may augment associated risks and require unique considerations for diagnosis and treatment.

Unfortunately, about 40% of individuals who know they have an alcohol or drug problem, such as Adderall and alcohol abuse, are not ready to stop using, and many others feel they do not have a problem or need treatment.


5 Million

2.1% (or 5 million) misused prescription stimulants at least once, and 0.2% (or 0.4 million) had prescription stimulant use disorders.

Source: SAMHSA

85,688

In 2019, of the 85,688 liver disease deaths among individuals ages 12 and older, 43.1% involved alcohol.

Source: SAMHSA

16.1 Million

5.8% (or about 16.1 million people) reported misusing any prescription psychotherapeutic drug in the past 12 months. Many people drink alcohol while using drugs to enhance or modify their experiences with these substances.

Source: SAMHSA


Alcohol and Adderall Addiction

Alcohol is the most regularly abused addictive substance in America, as more than 17 million people in the United States are considered to suffer from addiction to alcohol. Also, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration (SAMHSA) publishes that over 1.5 million American adults abuse a prescription stimulant drug.

Adderall mixed with alcohol magnifies the side effects and may promote dependency. One may be taken to offset the impact of the other, to enhance the “high,” or to lessen the “crash” that can ensue when one substance wears off. Increased dosage of stimulants and intensified alcohol consumption can cause a person’s brain chemistry to be altered.

Can you drink alcohol with Adderall? Both alcohol and stimulant drugs, such as Adderall, disrupt the normal absorption, production, and transmission of the neurotransmitter dopamine, essential in regulating moods and controlling willpower. High levels of dopamine happen due to both alcohol and Adderall pleasure. 

When these substances wear off, however, levels of dopamine drop and your mood falls as a result. This can encourage people to take these “feel-good” substances to increase happiness. Repeated alteration of the brain’s natural chemistry disrupts its chemical makeup and can even physically alter some of its circuitry and lead to drug dependence.

When someone is dependent on drugs or alcohol, withdrawal symptoms can manifest when these substances are inactive. Therefore, an individual may take a different psychoactive substance to attempt to dispel withdrawal symptoms. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) reports that alcohol may be used to counteract symptoms of stimulant withdrawal, for instance, which can, in turn, lead to withdrawal symptoms from alcohol as well.

Withdrawal symptoms may be more significant and last longer when multiple mind-altering substances, like alcohol and Adderall, are involved. 

When people are educated about the signs of abusing Adderall and alcoholism, they may be more likely to intervene if they encounter someone distressed due to alcohol abuse, leading to safer communities and potentially saving lives.
When people are educated about the signs of abusing Adderall and alcoholism, they may be more likely to intervene if they encounter someone distressed due to alcohol abuse, leading to safer communities and potentially saving lives.

Withdrawal From Adderall and Alcohol Abuse

Withdrawal can cause:

  • Paranoia.
  • Anxiety.
  • Depression.
  • Suicidal tendencies.
  • Hallucinations.
  • Psychosis.
  • Changes in appetite.
  • Adderall alcohol cravings.
  • Fatigue.
  • Insomnia.
  • Trouble concentrating.
  • Irritability.
  • Disorientation.
  • Restlessness.
  • Lack of energy.
  • Inability to feel pleasure.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Headaches.
  • Dizziness.
  • Muscle weakness.
  • Irregular heart rate and blood pressure.
  • Tremors.
  • Seizures.
  • Changes in body temperature.

Physical alcohol withdrawal symptoms can be life-threatening, and withdrawal from Adderall can be challenging. Can you drink on Adderall? When you combine alcohol and Adderall, these side effects may be especially hazardous. As a result, medical detox in a drug rehab facility is required to safely process these substances out of the body while managing the symptoms, often with medications.

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Adderall and Alcohol Addiction Treatment

Since Adderall and alcohol are substances that individuals can become physically dependent on, quitting will cause withdrawal symptoms. These withdrawal symptoms have the potential to be moderate, severe, and life-threatening. Therefore, people attempting to stop drinking alcohol, using Adderall, or mixing the two should seek professional help through an inpatient substance abuse treatment center.

For those experiencing an addiction to mixing Adderall and alcohol, detox may not be sufficient for long-term recovery. As a result, attending an inpatient treatment center may provide recovering individuals with the support and tools needed to build a strong foundation of sobriety. Treatment centers like We Level Up NJ understand the struggles of battling addiction independently. Because of that, we ensure that each client’s needs are met through individualized and comprehensive treatment plans.

When Adderall and alcohol misuse spiral into chronic substance use, it is time to seek a treatment program. Treatment for polydrug, or having more than one substance use disorder, is available in residential or inpatient settings. During rehab, the primary aim is to change the substance-seeking behaviors that have led to the cycle of addiction.

A comprehensive and individualized recovery program will give multiple treatment elements that work together to help make these fundamental shifts in thought and behavior patterns. These include:

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Can you overdose on Adderall and alcohol? Yes. Taking a stimulant like Adderall makes it harder for your body to recognize how much you drink. That simple fact about the alcohol and Adderall combo significantly increases your risk of alcohol poisoning. Adderall Lexapro and alcohol are another killer combo. As well as Wellbutrin, Adderall, and alcohol. The danger is real. Mixing alcohol with certain medications can cause nausea and vomiting, headaches, drowsiness, fainting, or loss of coordination.

If you’ve tried to quit in the past but ended up using Adderall and alcohol again, that’s a clear sign you need professional help. Get them the safest service they need and deserve. Our We Level Up New Jersey team specializes in creating an ideal environment and providing effective therapies.

Overcoming Adderall and Alcohol Withdrawal. Find the Support You Need.

Withdrawal from Adderall and alcohol is often a challenging process to go through alone. Many people experience relapses during withdrawal in an attempt to alleviate symptoms and satisfy cravings. However, you can manage withdrawal symptoms and successfully recover with detox and rehab therapy and a robust support system at the We Level Up treatment centers. If you require assistance with your rehab journey, contact a We Level Up New Jersey treatment professional now. Your call is free and confidential.

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Top 15 Most Common FAQs About What Happens If You Mix Adderall and Alcohol

  1. Is Adderall and alcohol safe?

    Adderall and alcohol should not be considered safe to mix. Combining the two can have potentially dangerous effects, as they can interact in ways that impair judgment, increase the risk of cardiovascular issues, and lead to other adverse reactions. It’s essential to follow medical advice and avoid alcohol when prescribed Adderall or any other medication.

  2. Can you drink alcohol while on Adderall?

    It is not recommended to drink alcohol while taking Adderall. Alcohol can counteract the effects of the medication, increase the risk of adverse side effects, and potentially lead to dangerous interactions. It’s crucial to consult with a healthcare provider for specific guidance regarding Adderall and alcohol interaction if you’re planning to drink.

  3. How long after Adderall can you drink alcohol?

    It is generally advisable to wait at least 24 hours after taking Adderall before consuming alcohol, as mixing Adderall and alcohol can potentially increase the risk of adverse side effects and impair judgment. However, consulting with a healthcare professional for personalized guidance is essential, as individual reactions to the combination can vary.

  4. What happens when you mix Adderall and alcohol?

    Mixing Adderall and alcohol can have several adverse effects. The stimulant properties of Adderall can mask the sedative effects of alcohol, potentially leading to increased alcohol consumption, impaired judgment, and a higher risk of alcohol poisoning. Also, the combination can strain the heart, increase the risk of cardiovascular issues, and lead to unpredictable and potentially dangerous behavior. Avoiding this combination and seeking medical advice if you have concerns about substance use is essential.

  5. What to do if you mix Adderall and alcohol?

    If you accidentally mix Adderall and alcohol and experience adverse effects or discomfort, seeking medical attention is essential. Be honest with healthcare providers about what you’ve taken to ensure proper evaluation and treatment, as this combination can have serious health risks and may require medical intervention.

  6. Can you overdose on Adderall and alcohol?

    Yes, it is possible to overdose on Adderall and alcohol when they are combined. Both substances can individually have harmful effects on the body, and combining them increases the risk of severe health consequences, including overdose symptoms such as seizures, heart problems, and even death. Mixing Adderall and alcohol is strongly discouraged, and seeking immediate medical attention is crucial if you suspect an overdose.

  7. What to drink with Adderall?

    When taking Adderall, staying hydrated is essential by drinking plenty of water throughout the day. Avoiding beverages high in caffeine or sugar is generally recommended, as they can exacerbate some of the side effects of the medication, such as jitteriness or increased heart rate.

  8. How long does Adderall last?

    The duration of the effects of Adderall can vary depending on the formulation (immediate-release or extended-release) and individual factors. Immediate-release Adderall typically lasts about 4 to 6 hours, while extended-release formulations can provide effects up to 12 hours.

  9. How long does Adderall stay in your system?

    Adderall has a half-life of about 10 hours, which means it takes about 10 hours for half of the drug to be eliminated from your system. In general, it can take around 2 to 3 days for Adderall to be mostly cleared from your body. However, the exact duration can vary depending on factors like individual metabolism and the specific type of Adderall taken.

  10. Can I drink alcohol after Adderall wears off?

    After Adderall has worn off, it is generally safer to wait for some time before consuming alcohol, allowing your body to metabolize the medication entirely. The specific duration may vary among individuals, but staying at least a few hours is advisable to reduce the risk of any potential interactions or adverse effects between Adderall and alcohol. It’s essential to consult with a healthcare professional for personalized guidance based on your health and medication regimen.

  11. Is Adderall addictive?

    Yes, Adderall can be addictive. It contains amphetamine and dextroamphetamine, which are stimulants with the potential for abuse and dependence. Misuse or prolonged use of Adderall without a medical need and supervision can lead to physical and psychological dependence, so it should only be taken as prescribed by a healthcare professional.

  12. Is Adderall bad for you?

    Adderall can have both benefits and risks, depending on the individual and the medical condition it’s prescribed for. When used as prescribed by a healthcare professional to treat conditions like ADHD or narcolepsy, it can be safe and effective. However, misuse or taking Adderall without a legitimate medical need can lead to serious health risks and should be avoided.

  13. Can you overdose on Adderall?

    Yes, it is possible to overdose on Adderall. An overdose can result in severe symptoms, including increased heart rate, high blood pressure, agitation, hallucinations, seizures, and, in extreme cases, it can be life-threatening. If someone suspects an Adderall and alcohol overdose, seeking immediate medical attention is essential.

  14. Does Adderall cause liver damage?

    Adderall is primarily metabolized in the liver, but there is limited evidence to suggest that it directly causes liver damage when used as prescribed. However, individual reactions can vary, and it’s crucial for individuals taking Adderall to have regular check-ups and follow their healthcare provider’s recommendations to monitor liver function and overall health.

  15. Is Adderall a controlled substance?

    Yes, Adderall is a controlled substance in many countries, including the United States. It is classified as a Schedule II controlled substance due to its potential for abuse and dependence. This classification means it is tightly regulated and can only be legally obtained with a prescription from a licensed healthcare provider.

Dangers of Adderall and Alcohol. Alcohol Poisoning Symptoms, Signs, Cures, Effects, and What To Do?

Drinking on Adderall can be life-threatening, leading to various harmful effects and increasing the risk of alcohol poisoning. Symptoms of alcohol poisoning include confusion, vomiting, seizures, slow or irregular breathing, hypothermia, and unconsciousness.

Suppose you suspect someone is experiencing alcohol poisoning. In that case, calling for immediate medical help is crucial by dialing emergency services and trying to keep the person awake and sitting up while awaiting medical assistance. Never leave them alone, and do not attempt to “sober them up” with cold showers or hot drinks, as these methods can be ineffective and potentially harmful.

Also, it is essential to understand that combining Adderall and alcohol can have many other serious effects, including increased heart rate, high blood pressure, impaired judgment, and risky behavior. It is strongly advised to avoid mixing these substances altogether to minimize these risks. If you or someone you know is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, seeking help from a healthcare professional or addiction specialist is highly recommended.

Do you have questions about Adderall and alcohol abuse or treatment in general? Call our helpline 24/7.

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Sources

[1] Drug and Alcohol Use in College-Age Adults in 2018 – National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) related article: can you mix adderall and alcohol?

[2] Prescription Stimulants DrugFacts – National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

[3] What is the scope of prescription drug misuse in the United States? – Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

[4] Detoxification and Substance Abuse Treatment – Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

[5] We Level Up Treatment CenterAdderall Addiction Treatment

[6] We Level Up Treatment CenterAlcohol Detox

[7] McKay JR. Impact of Continuing Care on Recovery From Substance Use Disorder. Alcohol Res. 2021 Jan 21;41(1):01. DOI: 10.35946 PMID: 33500871; PMCID: PMC7813220.

[8] Fluyau D, Charlton TE. Drug Addiction. [Updated 2022 Aug 29]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2022 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK549783/

[9] Justinova Z, Panlilio LV, Goldberg SR. Drug addiction. Curr Top Behav Neurosci. 2009;1:309-46. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-540-88955-7_13. PMID: 21104390; PMCID: PMC3039293.

[10] Jahan AR, Burgess DM. Substance Use Disorder. [Updated 2022 May 5]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2022 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK570642/